Fortunately gas explosions do not happen often, but when they do happen the below can be expected. These gas explosions can be prevented with domestic or commercial gas detection, depending on the problem. 

Gas Explosion is a National Problem

The March 12 natural gas explosion that leveled two Manhattan buildings, killing seven and injuring 60, is just one of the explosive gas incidents in the U.S. that annually cause an average of 17 fatalities and $133 million in damage. The blast area is served by a 127-year-old gas main, an apt symbol of America’s aging pipelines. It is not just pipes, one publication said: “Valves are another issue — a loose gas valve can do all the damage, all by itself, releasing gas.” Utilities are grappling with the problem and its costs. A March 11 report estimated that New York City’s infrastructure will need $47 billion in repairs in the next five years. In Washington, D.C., researchers found 5,893 gas leaks, and potentially explosive concentrations of gas at 12 manholes.